Homeless in Chelmsford

Chelmsford had only three homeless students last year, but at the start of this school year, it suddenly had 34. “When a child is homeless, it’s really the community’s responsibility to make sure that child is safe and succeeds, but it lands on the shoulders of the schools to make that happen,” Yeoman said. “We needed to organize a way that people can help with service.” for more

Homeless.us

Chelmsford’s Homeless

ok a few extra’s kids in class and administration are whining how their’s no money to educate the homeless kids of chelmsford “”"it;s against school policy to have more then x number of kids in class”"” they don’t tell you their the ones that make policy,,now iv heard it all. So were (the tax payers of chelmsford) are supposed to believe a few extra kids in each class (homeless ones) is going to cripple the town’s resources . Talk about excuses not to teach or something else to complain about where does the complaining and whining stop?

homeless.us

9/11

for 9/11 Heroes.us and Taps.us

Homeless and HHS

HHS is the United States government’s principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and supporting the delivery of essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. As such, the delivery of treatment and services to persons experiencing homelessness is included in the activities of the Department. The coordination of these services, both within the Department, as well as with our Federal partners who provide housing and complementary service programs, is a critical component of achieving the goal of preventing and ending homelessness.

Grants
Ending homelessness requires housing combined with the types of services supported by HHS programs. The delivery of treatment and services to persons experiencing homelessness are included in the activities of the Department, both in five programs specifically targeted to homeless individuals and in twelve non-targeted, or mainstream, service delivery programs.
ResourcesIn addition to grant programs and research relevant to homelessness, the Department of Health and Human Services also funds several resource centers and activities that provide valuable information for consumers, providers, and policymakers. Several HHS Operating Divisions also have web pages with agency-specific information related to homelessness.
Research & Publications
In order to develop strategies to effectively provide health and human services to persons experiencing homelessness, the Department must first understand who becomes homeless and understand the service needs of those facing homelessness. Therefore, the Department supports research on homelessness to develop further knowledge and evidence-based practices for the provision of treatment and services, as well as to investigate opportunities to prevent homelessness among vulnerable populations.

Poverty

gas prices almost too high to handle,electric bills out of control, use less but pay more,food prices increases due to gas prices and what your home you thought was worth if your still holding on to it is worth about 30% less then last year,lets see did i leave any thing out oh listening to the bags of wind runing for election and how they are going to “change” America .. Their’s a new poverty in America ,folks who never took food stamps are taking them ,folks who had the big house big mortgages are loosing them almost as common as the weather changing,

but you know what were living in America where they;ll always be hope of starting over and the ability and opportunity to get back what was lost.

America with it’s problems I’ll take over any other country in the world.

poverty.us

Taps.us

Taps.us

Let us advance the common purpose by refusing to excuse or legitimate terror but, equally, by insisting that every person be seen fairly as an individual and not on their race or their creed.
Let us honor those who are prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice to defend our freedom and show our support for those among us who have the courage to make that fateful choice.

Let us manifest our common purpose by renewing our commitment to this nation and, above all, to the values for which it stands.

Let us reflect — carefully, courageously, drawing upon our accumulated knowledge and all our capacity to reason — how we can best defend and advance the ideal of freedom. Let our moral clarity be translated not into reflexive revenge but into determination to prevail against terror and build a better world.

For ultimately, we will be judged not by what we oppose, but by what together we work towards.

- Lawrence Summers

Trouble with Foreclosure

Are you having trouble keeping up with your mortgage payments? Have you received a notice from your lender asking you to contact them?

Don’t ignore the letters from your lender
Contact your lender immediately
Contact a HUD-approved Housing Counseling Agency
Toll FREE (800) 569-4287
TTY (800) 877-8339
If you are unable to make your mortgage payment:

1. Don’t ignore the problem.

The further behind you become, the harder it will be to reinstate your loan and the more likely that you will lose your house.

2. Contact your lender as soon as you realize that you have a problem.

Lenders do not want your house. They have options to help borrowers through difficult financial times.

3. Open and respond to all mail from your lender.

The first notices you receive will offer good information about foreclosure prevention options that can help you weather financial problems. Later mail may include important notice of pending legal action. Your failure to open the mail will not be an excuse in foreclosure court.

4. Know your mortgage rights.

Find your loan documents and read them so you know what your lender may do if you can’t make your payments. Learn about the foreclosure laws and timeframes in your state (as every state is different) by contacting the State Government Housing Office.

5. Understand foreclosure prevention options.

Valuable information about foreclosure prevention (also called loss mitigation) options can be found on the internet at portal.hud.gov/portal/page?_pageid=33,717348&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL .

6. Contact a HUD-approved housing counselor.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) funds free or very low cost housing counseling nationwide. Housing counselors can help you understand the law and your options, organize your finances and represent you in negotiations with your lender if you need this assistance. Find a HUD-approved housing counselor near you or call (800) 569-4287 or TTY (800) 877-8339.

7. Prioritize your spending.

After healthcare, keeping your house should be your first priority. Review your finances and see where you can cut spending in order to make your mortgage payment. Look for optional expenses-cable TV, memberships, entertainment-that you can eliminate. Delay payments on credit cards and other “unsecured” debt until you have paid your mortgage.

8. Use your assets.

Do you have assets-a second car, jewelry, a whole life insurance policy-that you can sell for cash to help reinstate your loan? Can anyone in your household get an extra job to bring in additional income? Even if these efforts don’t significantly increase your available cash or your income, they demonstrate to your lender that you are willing to make sacrifices to keep your home.

9. Avoid foreclosure prevention companies.

You don’t need to pay fees for foreclosure prevention help-use that money to pay the mortgage instead. Many for-profit companies will contact you promising to negotiate with your lender. While these may be legitimate businesses, they will charge you a hefty fee (often two or three month’s mortgage payment) for information and services your lender or a HUD approved housing counselor will provide free if you contact them.

10. Don’t lose your house to foreclosure recovery scams!

If any firm claims they can stop your foreclosure immediately if you sign a document appointing them to act on your behalf, you may well be signing over the title to your property and becoming a renter in your own home! Never sign a legal document without reading and understanding all the terms and getting professional advice from an attorney, a trusted real estate professional, or a HUD approved housing counselor.

Poverty and Boston Rising

  • Nice story in boston business journal ,, Ken Nickerson,,,With a $15 million, five-year grant from his family foundation as seed money, Nickerson has started Boston Rising, a fund that aims to support effective anti-poverty programs in and around the city.
    The fund is based on Robin Hood, the successful New York City nonprofit that was started by hedge fund titan Paul Tudor Jones of Tudor Investment Corp. in 1988 and named for the legendary archetype who stole from the rich to give to the poor. The fund is not officially affiliated with Robin Hood. for more

    Poverty.us for a state directory of poverty in the US.

Super deeds for Super Bowl

With all the parties and excitement in the air over the super bowl it’s easy forget
about the folks that it’s just another day trying to keep warm in the streets or looking for something to eat , here’s a super good deed

They will be given showers, hair cuts, a meal, some clothing and goodie bags — and a seat near the television where they can watch the New England Patriots try to go undefeated as they battle the New York Giants for pro football’s biggest prize.
Watching the game really is a big thing, said Dwagne Haskins, the director of the community outreach program at Mt. Olive. So, too, is the grooming and food. What sets the night apart, however, he said, is the good feeling imparted upon a group of people who rarely experience the care or concern of others. source: atlanta journal

kids and homeless

The fed gvt has a neat site for kids teaching them about the homeless here

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    The San Francisco Half Marathon was set to begin in three minutes, and Goodman was in the front of the pack wearing racing bib number 25779. While most of the other 5,500 runners alongside him had slept in comfortable beds the night before, the 54-year-old Goodman had spent his usual night in a tent under Highway 101. Goodman's dream was to be officiall […]
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